Culture

The Mankind’s Eyes in Orbit: The Hubble Space Telescope Images as Cultural Artifacts

The Mankind’s Eyes in Orbit: The Hubble Space Telescope Images as Cultural Artifacts

In the realm of our corporeal existence, the vision apparatus is often regarded as one of the most important senses for survival. From art to science, the micro- and macro dimensions of the universe in which the Homo sapiens experiences are established through vision.[1] Particularly when turning the heads and eyes toward the night sky, vision allows species to objectify what we see, regardless of the inability to experience things that are ‘out there’, separated from our existence here on Earth—physically and culturally. Primarily functioning through vision—that is, the process of obtaining information by interacting with electromagnetic radiation—the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) revolutionized mankind’s objectification of the universe and its ‘weirdness’. Named after the influential American astronomer in the 20th century Edwin Hubble, who was responsible for the discovery that we live in one of the uncountable galaxies in a fast expanding universe, the impact of the HST as a scientific artifact will live on for many generations to come.

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American Qur'an: Cultural Understanding Through Art

American Qur'an: Cultural Understanding Through Art

Short version originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon.

Since 9/11, hate crimes against Muslims in the United States have reached alarming numbers. In the past five to six years, Islamophobia soared to its highest levels since the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City in 2001. From then on, multiple mosques across the country have been attacked, Muslim women wearing the hijab have suffered abuse, and the central text of Islam—the Qur’an—an Arabic word meaning “the recitation”—has been defaced and ridiculed by many.

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Brazil’s cultural legacy following the Games in Rio

Brazil’s cultural legacy following the Games in Rio

Work originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon

From the top of Corcovado hill, Christ the Redeemer towered over Rio de Janeiro as athletes from around the world arrived in Brazil for the event that has been regarded by some as a “renovation of the Brazilian spirit” while by others as an “unnatural catastrophe.”

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Living in Diaspora: The memoir of a Pakistani and a Brazilian in the United States

Living in Diaspora: The memoir of a Pakistani and a Brazilian in the United States

This essay was written by Sara Fatimah for a cross-cultural communication class at the University of Oregon during Spring 2016

In 2009, the British journal “The Economist” published an article under the title “Being Foreign: The Other,” which highlights the Freudian idea of melancholia. The basic premise is that such melancholia embraces a “continuing, debilitating sense of loss, somewhere within which lies anger at the thing lost. It is not the possibility of returning home which feeds nostalgia, but the impossibility of it.” Melancholia, in this case, changed my mindset about the world and people around me, such as Iago Bojczuk, a 22-year-old University of Oregon student.

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