English

Transmedia Storytelling and Transnational Fandoms: The Pokémon Franchise at the Turn of the 21st Century

Transmedia Storytelling and Transnational Fandoms: The Pokémon Franchise at the Turn of the 21st Century

Work originally published as a blog post at MIT’s Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab.

In the late 1990s, Time magazine had the following headline stamped on its cover page: “Pokémon: For many kids it’s now an addiction—cards, video games, toys, a new movie. Is it bad for them?”1 That edition came out only five years after the Pokémon universe emerged out of the inventive mind of the Japanese video game designer Satoshi Tajiri. In the following years, Pokémon rapidly became a worldwide phenomenon, leading many to even call it “Japan’s most successful export.”

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Civic Cyborgs: Revamping Democratic Participation via the Smartphone and Mobile Internet

Civic Cyborgs: Revamping Democratic Participation via the Smartphone and Mobile Internet

The Internet has broadened not only the way people think about the world and themselves but also their belonging in communities. From India to Brazil, the Internet has also enabled the creation of a virtual space that allows youth to gather and create content. While online space remains an accessible channel for information gathering, another tool is shaping the way people access—and create meaning—around these spaces: the smartphone. 

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Memes and Internet Culture

Memes and Internet Culture

Work originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon

It is undeniable that the Internet has changed the way we perceive the world. With increased access to the World Wide Web, people are now able to exchange information with family and friends around the globe without geographical boundaries. Either by using a smartphone to share a 140-character message on Twitter to help find the victims of a natural disaster or by denouncing human rights violation in war zones, the Internet has also expanded how we help one another as individuals.

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Pursuing Human Rights

Pursuing Human Rights

Open letter originally published in the Global Ducks Newsletter distributed by the UO Alumni Association.

Many people seem to have the idea that youth are only capable of playing a secondary role when it comes to human rights.However, my experience during spring break as one of seven Oxford Consortium Human Rights Fellows from the UO has convinced me otherwise. It showed me that we can have an active voice in denouncing human rights violations, changed my understanding of what it means to be human, and offered many opportunities to help others.

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American Qur'an: Cultural Understanding Through Art

American Qur'an: Cultural Understanding Through Art

Short version originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon.

Since 9/11, hate crimes against Muslims in the United States have reached alarming numbers. In the past five to six years, Islamophobia soared to its highest levels since the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City in 2001. From then on, multiple mosques across the country have been attacked, Muslim women wearing the hijab have suffered abuse, and the central text of Islam—the Qur’an—an Arabic word meaning “the recitation”—has been defaced and ridiculed by many.

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Brazil’s cultural legacy following the Games in Rio

Brazil’s cultural legacy following the Games in Rio

Work originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon

From the top of Corcovado hill, Christ the Redeemer towered over Rio de Janeiro as athletes from around the world arrived in Brazil for the event that has been regarded by some as a “renovation of the Brazilian spirit” while by others as an “unnatural catastrophe.”

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Living in Diaspora: The memoir of a Pakistani and a Brazilian in the United States

Living in Diaspora: The memoir of a Pakistani and a Brazilian in the United States

This essay was written by Sara Fatimah for a cross-cultural communication class at the University of Oregon during Spring 2016

In 2009, the British journal “The Economist” published an article under the title “Being Foreign: The Other,” which highlights the Freudian idea of melancholia. The basic premise is that such melancholia embraces a “continuing, debilitating sense of loss, somewhere within which lies anger at the thing lost. It is not the possibility of returning home which feeds nostalgia, but the impossibility of it.” Melancholia, in this case, changed my mindset about the world and people around me, such as Iago Bojczuk, a 22-year-old University of Oregon student.

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Building a more resilient and collaborative world: the power of youth as global change actors

Building a more resilient and collaborative world: the power of youth as global change actors

Before crossing the Pacific Ocean, I already knew this would probably be one of the most challenging-but-rewarding experiences of my life. Only upon my return to Oregon did I realize how greatly the event had allowed me to grow, to be inspired by and motivated toward positive actions by learning with other 200 youth from more than 35 countries around the planet. Without the generous support of the Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon, it would not have been possible.

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