The Mankind’s Eyes in Orbit: The Hubble Space Telescope Images as Cultural Artifacts

The Mankind’s Eyes in Orbit: The Hubble Space Telescope Images as Cultural Artifacts

In the realm of our corporeal existence, the vision apparatus is often regarded as one of the most important senses for survival. From art to science, the micro- and macro dimensions of the universe in which the Homo sapiens experiences are established through vision.[1] Particularly when turning the heads and eyes toward the night sky, vision allows species to objectify what we see, regardless of the inability to experience things that are ‘out there’, separated from our existence here on Earth—physically and culturally. Primarily functioning through vision—that is, the process of obtaining information by interacting with electromagnetic radiation—the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) revolutionized mankind’s objectification of the universe and its ‘weirdness’. Named after the influential American astronomer in the 20th century Edwin Hubble, who was responsible for the discovery that we live in one of the uncountable galaxies in a fast expanding universe, the impact of the HST as a scientific artifact will live on for many generations to come.

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Zap Zap, Who’s There? WhatsApp and the Spread of Fake News During the 2018 Elections in Brazil

Zap Zap, Who’s There? WhatsApp and the Spread of Fake News During the 2018 Elections in Brazil

Work originally published as a blog post for MIT’s Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab.

WhatsApp is a self-defined “fast, simple, secure messaging and calling” app. Its meteoric growth in the decade since the January 2009 release has earned it one of the largest user bases in the world, with an impressive total of 1.5 billion monthly users.[1] Its simplicity is, indeed, one of its core selling points, especially in countries in the Global South where Internet services are becoming increasingly present in people’s everyday lives and are shaping the simplest forms of interaction. The app considers every phone number as a user and automatically adds your phone’s contact list as your WhatsApp contacts. It enables users to message these contacts and also to create groups with them, which in Brazil has become a widespread cultural practice.

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“Meu caro amigo eu bem queria lhe escrever...”

“Meu caro amigo eu bem queria lhe escrever...”

Eu comecei escrever este texto pelo menos duas vezes mas o apaguei. Pensei. Reescrevi. Apaguei novamente. Resolvi, então, escrever mesmo assim pois talvez seja a única forma de atingir mais pessoas estando longe. À medida que avançamos para a reta final da decisão de grande parte do futuro, peço que, seja lá qual for sua opção, considere algumas coisas.

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Transmedia Storytelling and Transnational Fandoms: The Pokémon Franchise at the Turn of the 21st Century

Transmedia Storytelling and Transnational Fandoms: The Pokémon Franchise at the Turn of the 21st Century

Work originally published as a blog post at MIT’s Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab.

In the late 1990s, Time magazine had the following headline stamped on its cover page: “Pokémon: For many kids it’s now an addiction—cards, video games, toys, a new movie. Is it bad for them?”1 That edition came out only five years after the Pokémon universe emerged out of the inventive mind of the Japanese video game designer Satoshi Tajiri. In the following years, Pokémon rapidly became a worldwide phenomenon, leading many to even call it “Japan’s most successful export.”

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Civic Cyborgs: Revamping Democratic Participation via the Smartphone and Mobile Internet

Civic Cyborgs: Revamping Democratic Participation via the Smartphone and Mobile Internet

The Internet has broadened not only the way people think about the world and themselves but also their belonging in communities. From India to Brazil, the Internet has also enabled the creation of a virtual space that allows youth to gather and create content. While online space remains an accessible channel for information gathering, another tool is shaping the way people access—and create meaning—around these spaces: the smartphone. 

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Memes and Internet Culture

Memes and Internet Culture

Work originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon

It is undeniable that the Internet has changed the way we perceive the world. With increased access to the World Wide Web, people are now able to exchange information with family and friends around the globe without geographical boundaries. Either by using a smartphone to share a 140-character message on Twitter to help find the victims of a natural disaster or by denouncing human rights violation in war zones, the Internet has also expanded how we help one another as individuals.

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Pursuing Human Rights

Pursuing Human Rights

Open letter originally published in the Global Ducks Newsletter distributed by the UO Alumni Association.

Many people seem to have the idea that youth are only capable of playing a secondary role when it comes to human rights.However, my experience during spring break as one of seven Oxford Consortium Human Rights Fellows from the UO has convinced me otherwise. It showed me that we can have an active voice in denouncing human rights violations, changed my understanding of what it means to be human, and offered many opportunities to help others.

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American Qur'an: Cultural Understanding Through Art

American Qur'an: Cultural Understanding Through Art

Short version originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon.

Since 9/11, hate crimes against Muslims in the United States have reached alarming numbers. In the past five to six years, Islamophobia soared to its highest levels since the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City in 2001. From then on, multiple mosques across the country have been attacked, Muslim women wearing the hijab have suffered abuse, and the central text of Islam—the Qur’an—an Arabic word meaning “the recitation”—has been defaced and ridiculed by many.

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Brazil’s cultural legacy following the Games in Rio

Brazil’s cultural legacy following the Games in Rio

Work originally published in Ethos Magazine, a nationally recognized and award-winning student publication at the University of Oregon

From the top of Corcovado hill, Christ the Redeemer towered over Rio de Janeiro as athletes from around the world arrived in Brazil for the event that has been regarded by some as a “renovation of the Brazilian spirit” while by others as an “unnatural catastrophe.”

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72 horas desde a vitória de Trump

72 horas desde a vitória de Trump

Em junho deste ano, enquanto estava prestes a embarcar em um voo de Seattle para Nova York, eu percebi que havia três pessoas atrás de mim vestindo uma camiseta cinza que dizia Make America Great Again (Faça América Grande Outra Vez). Desconfiado, porém, de certa forma calmo, achei meu acento do lado da janela no avião, onde sempre costumo sentar. Depois de um tempo, percebi que duas dessas pessoas sentariam do meu lado esquerdo.

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Living in Diaspora: The memoir of a Pakistani and a Brazilian in the United States

Living in Diaspora: The memoir of a Pakistani and a Brazilian in the United States

This essay was written by Sara Fatimah for a cross-cultural communication class at the University of Oregon during Spring 2016

In 2009, the British journal “The Economist” published an article under the title “Being Foreign: The Other,” which highlights the Freudian idea of melancholia. The basic premise is that such melancholia embraces a “continuing, debilitating sense of loss, somewhere within which lies anger at the thing lost. It is not the possibility of returning home which feeds nostalgia, but the impossibility of it.” Melancholia, in this case, changed my mindset about the world and people around me, such as Iago Bojczuk, a 22-year-old University of Oregon student.

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A Liberdade e Medo de ser Criança na Vida Adulta

A Liberdade e Medo de ser Criança na Vida Adulta

Work originally published for the Brazilian Student Association (BRASA).

Lá pelos 10 anos de idade, eu lembro que era sempre divertido passar horas brincando de ser adulto, mesmo quando minha mãe parecia querer estragar tudo quando meus amigos e eu estávamos na melhor parte. Aliás, atire primeira pedra aquele que nunca brincou de escolinha ou qualquer outra aventura que envolvesse a imaginação e a vontade de ser gente grande. Vir para a faculdade fora do Brasil, morar longe, falar outra língua e muitas vezes quebrar a cara parecem não ser o suficiente.

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No Brasil se fala Português, né?

No Brasil se fala Português, né?

Work originally written for the Brazilian Student Association (BRASA) blog.

7:30 a.m. na costa oeste Americana e mais de meio dia no horário de Brasília. O despertador do meu celular toca e a música “Será” do Legião Urbana me acorda de Segunda à Sexta-feira. “Eu posso estar sozinho mas eu sei muito bem onde estou.” Talvez não seja bem assim comigo, Renato Russo.

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A Valorização da Diverdade

A Valorização da Diverdade

Work originally published for the Brazilian Student Association (BRASA) blog.

Olá! Bonjour! Namaste! Marhaba! Nǐ hǎo! Hola!
Hoje, o post é a razão pela qual escrevemos para vocês sobre nossa experiência em universidades no exterior: a valorização da diversidade e a contribuição da nossa cultura fora com outros povos.
No fim das contas, todos nós concordamos que a vivência em uma universidade americana vai muito além dos lotados lecture halls ou dos grupos de estudo espalhados pelo campus, seja no quarto andar da biblioteca, no dining hallou até mesmo no seu quarto cheio de papeis na mesa e roupas espalhadas.

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Fall Brings Change

Fall Brings Change

Work originally written for the Brazilian Student Association (BRASA) blog.

Este foi, sem dúvidas, um dos trimestres mais difíceis—até mais difícil de quando eu tentei me arriscar a estudar árabe ano passado. Entretanto, tudo acabou que passando rápido quando olho pra trás agora. Há um bom tempo venho alimentando a ideia de estudar um outro idioma e acabei escolhendo Francês este ano como parte do requerimento para o Bacharelado em Artes. No EUA, há geralmente dois títulos principais na graduação: Bachelor of Arts (BA) e Bachelor of Science (BS).

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La inspiración como el nuevo periodismo

La inspiración como el nuevo periodismo

Work originally published in Spanish in the Peruvian-based magazine Punto de Encuentro.

El "fin" ha sido siempre material de apelación en la tradición humana y el periodismo. En cuanto a la humanidad, "el fin" se encuentra en el opuesto exacto de la creación de todo. A partir de la teoría del Big Bang hasta el hinduismo y sus gloriosos dioses —como Brahma, el creador, y Shiva, el destructor-final— sigue siendo un misterio. En cualquier circunstancia, todos estamos condenados a morir. El periodismo, sin embargo, no lo es. Así como sus grandes hitos datan desde el inicio de la modernidad en tiempos de lejanas exploraciones marinas, el futuro de los periodistas se conectará con las pluralidades de los caminos en los que el periodismo realizará. En efecto, no se trata de un único camino en el futuro del periodismo, sino de diversos caminos, como lo demuestra la experiencia de Johannes Gutenberg en el siglo 15.

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Hora de férias de verão?

Hora de férias de verão?

Work originally published for the Brazilian Student Association (BRASA) blog.

“Have a great summer!” —Esta foi a frase que eu sempre esperaria um dia poder ouvir durante a minha experiência estudando nos Estados Unidos. Como um fã de longa data de Harry Potter, sempre me perguntava o que o verão ou inverno realmente significaria para quem mora no hemisfério norte, mesmo que você fosse obrigado a ficar debaixo das escadas na casa dos tios Dursleys na casa da Rua dos Alfeneiros.

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Building a more resilient and collaborative world: the power of youth as global change actors

Building a more resilient and collaborative world: the power of youth as global change actors

Before crossing the Pacific Ocean, I already knew this would probably be one of the most challenging-but-rewarding experiences of my life. Only upon my return to Oregon did I realize how greatly the event had allowed me to grow, to be inspired by and motivated toward positive actions by learning with other 200 youth from more than 35 countries around the planet. Without the generous support of the Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon, it would not have been possible.

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